All posts by Todd Aebischer

What Does A Country Director Do?

The Vital Role… Part I

Folks often understand the roles of Pilots, Engineers, Accountants, Mechanics…but what about Country Directors? We’re often asked, “What do you do?”

Since 2017, Connie and I have been serving as the Country Director for MAF in Papua New Guinea. Last year, MAF New Zealand wrote a great article on the Vital Role of a Country Director. Here are excerpts from that article….

Like the captain of a ship or the conductor of an orchestra, Country Directors often work in the background – yet they play a central role in each of MAF’s overseas programmes. MAF is a guest in each country we operate in, and our ability to stay there often relies on the Country Directors. They build and maintain strong relationships with national churches, NGOs, host-country officials, local leaders and government departments. They communicate a clear sense of vision and purpose to get these groups ‘on board’ with the vision and work of MAF. Finally, leading by example, they set the Christian tone in the MAF work environment and make sure the whole team is heading in the same direction.

Ian McBride, served in Arnhem Land from 2006-2010. He believes that the key focus of the role is, “setting the culture’ of a programme, with a strong focus on pastoral care of the team. He likens it to wearing many different hats – along with the ability to switch hats, depending on what is happening on any particular day.”

Doug Miles (along with wife Yvonne) who has most recently served as Programme Director in Arnhem Land says that, “…the role is about teamwork and ensuring the team functions to its full potential. A highlight is seeing the impact we are making on the people we serve.”

Bill Harding, who is currently Director for International development for MAF International and who previously served as a Country Director in Kenya from 1996-1999 says, “A few things about the role have changed, but it remains hugely challenging and rewarding. At a professional level you are running a small business using a ‘developed world’ technology in a developing country, which brings many challenges. You oversee the people and systems which ensure the operations are safe and compliant with local authorities. You lease, buy, or build housing and hangar space, manage budgets, ensure the import of aircraft parts and fuel is assured, not to mention pilots, engineers, and other staff. You manage a range of staff, some of whom are international, come are local, some are highly trained while others are learning and growing. Above all you are aiming for the team you lead to most effectively respond to the need of access to bring help, hope, and healing. “

“At a mission level you are leading a group of Christian missionaries called by God to ‘take the road less travelled.’ They are typically determined and resilient, with hearts of gold, but they come from different cultural, denominational, and personal backgrounds, so they may see the world and God at work in it very differently. “

“Along with management there is a pastoral care element because unlike a normal employer, the mission takes responsibility for spiritual wellbeing. the physical welfare of the team is a challenge too, if you are in a place where car jackings and break-ins are the norm. “

Connie doing blood pressures for the team members on Friday – a regular occurrence as we show Care to our team!

Bill continues. “At a personal level it means being flexible with people and adaptable to circumstances. The scope of the work that I undertook on any given day ranged from grand things like talking to the United Nations about access to South Sudan or deciding on a new hangar design, through to trying to find out who’s gone home with the keys to the MAF van, which is now urgently needed to pick up a visitor from the airport or sorting out the blocked toilet in a neighbouring MAF house because it’s late at night!”

Bill Harding in 1996, preparing to show the Jesus Film

In Part II of this blog on the vital role of Country Directors, we’ll focus a be more specifically on the role in the, “Land of the Bird of Paradise,” Papua New Guinea.

Home Assignment Dates Set – We’re On Our Way!

I lift my eyes to the mountains – where does my help come from? My help comes from the Lord, the Maker of heaven and earth…the Lord will watch over your coming and going both now and forevermore! Psalm 121

It’s hard to believe that our last formal Ministry Partnership Tour was in 2019, this due to the challenges associated with Covid! But…praise the Lord, those days are over and we are headed to the US in July for our 2023 Ministry Partnership Tour. We’ve just been able to finalize the dates, secure programme management coverage, and purchase the tickets!

We are working on the schedule now and would so appreciate the opportunity to be able to share with your church, small group, family, or personally, about the tremendous work that MAF is doing in one of the most remote nations in the world. Below is just a small sample from one of our flights around Easter.

We would so greatly appreciate your prayers as we: pack up our home to be used by others while we are gone, finish the 5-year strategic ministry plan, host a leadership summit of 32 participants (both from inside and outside the country), prepare for a Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) team who will be arriving in May for a month, complete our 5-year Civil Aviation Safety Audit for our Engineering Department (8-12 May), work on budget submissions, and prepare to depart to the US in just a few short weeks!

As I was out walking the runway this morning, pondering the above list that needs to be completed before we can step on the plane, my mind went to Psalm 121. I’m so glad that the Maker of the heaven and earth is carrying us along, every day, and every step of the way!

MAF Pilot Ryan Koher Released from Prison in Mozambique!

๐’๐ญ๐š๐ญ๐ž๐ฆ๐ž๐ง๐ญ ๐Ÿ๐ซ๐จ๐ฆ ๐Œ๐€๐…-๐”๐’๐€ ๐จ๐ง ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐ซ๐ž๐ฅ๐ž๐š๐ฌ๐ž ๐จ๐Ÿ ๐Œ๐€๐… ๐ฉ๐ข๐ฅ๐จ๐ญ ๐‘๐ฒ๐š๐ง ๐Š๐จ๐ก๐ž๐ซ ๐Ÿ๐ซ๐จ๐ฆ ๐ฉ๐ซ๐ข๐ฌ๐จ๐ง ๐ข๐ง ๐Œ๐จ๐ณ๐š๐ฆ๐›๐ข๐ช๐ฎ๐ž

Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) is pleased to confirm that pilot Ryan Koher has been granted a provisional release from prison in Mozambique.

Koher, an American pilot, along with two South African men, W.J. du Plessis and Eric Dry, also detained, left prison late on Tuesday afternoon. They have been held for more than four months.

They are required to remain in Mozambique and the case is still ongoing. We are continuing to learn more about next steps in the case from our legal counsel.

Ryan has talked with his wife, Annabel, and his two boys multiple times now and he is doing well.

The executive leadership team of MAF-US expresses its thanks for all those who have been praying for Ryan and his family. We ask for continued prayer that the final outcome will be a full release of Ryan from any charges and trial.

MAF is grateful to the courts in Mozambique for this decision. Out of respect for the legal process in Mozambique, MAF will make no further comment at this time.

To our team – thank you so very much for your committed prayers on behalf of Ryan, Annabel, their family, Eric, Willem, and all involved! The Lord is good and to be praised!!!

http://maf.org/press

Triple Medevac from Sengapi

We are blessed to have Swiss Civil Service Volunteers serving with us here at MAF in Papua New Guinea. One of those volunteers, Ralf Hartmann, normally busy in the office assisting our IT department, had the chance to join a medevac flight for three patients with broken legs from Sengapi to Mt Hagen. Here is his story…

One sleepy Saturday morning, I was jolted out of my book by a knock on the door. The neighbour was asking if I would like to observe a medevac of three patients with broken legs. I immediately agreed and 30 minutes later I was at the Mt Hagen airport helping the ground crew move seats out of the plane so that two stretchers could be fixed to the floor of the cabin.

Before take-off, the pilot asked if I still wanted to come as he was expecting heavy turbulence. I decided to go, nevertheless. Shortly afterward, I buckled myself into the aircraft at the co-pilotโ€™s seat and we were waiting for clearance from the control tower to take off for Sengapi.

Soon, the pilot received the take-off clearance from the tower controller, and we were airborne, heading to Sengapi. Fortunately, there was almost no turbulence during the 20-minute flight, and upon landing, we were greeted by about a hundred people and three injured patients.

 For more than 50 years, MAF has been helping [the village] by transporting cargo and injured people. Without this lifeline, many of the people would have suffered permanent damage or even died if they could not be treated in a hospital.  – Ralf Hartmann

– Ralf Hartmann

One of the patients was a child of about five years, carried by his father. The second one, a young teenager, was carried on a make-shift stretcher and obviously in a lot of pain. The third patient, a middle-aged man, was carried to the plane in a wheelbarrow.

While this man was transferred to the MAF stretcher and onto the plane, the teenager’s fracture had to be stabilised with the help of two branches. As the boy was stabilised and also transferred onto the plane, I came into contact with many kinds of people. They told me what life is like in a village without road access and how grateful they are to MAF. For more than 50 years, MAF has been helping them by transporting cargo and injured people. Without this possibility, many people would suffer permanent damage or even die if they could not be treated in a hospital. After the patients were loaded and the pilot was still busy with paperwork, they showed me what infrastructure they had in their village. They were especially proud of their church and their own school. (MAF has been serving in PNG for more than 72 years – beginning operations here in 1951).

When all the administrative work was done, we could start our flight back to Mt Hagen. Thankfully, there was hardly any turbulence, and we soon landed safely at the Kagamuga airfield.

Now it was time to take the patients from the plane to the waiting ambulance. We transported the three patients to the ambulance using one of the cargo trolleys. The ambulance, a normal Toyota Land Cruiser, did not have any in-built stretchers like our ambulances in Switzerland, so we had to move the people from the stretcher to the seat benches. After another 15 minutes, the patients were on their way to the Kudjip Nazarene Hospital to receive professional medical care.

Thank you for continuing to pray for and partner with us and the MAF International Team as we serve here in Papua New Guinea!

For more great stories about the work here in PNG, please visit this link!

Mission Aviation Fellowship Issues Urgent Call for Release of U.S. Citizen Wrongfully Detained in Mozambique

Pilot Ryan Koher taken into custody when preparing to fly supplies to orphanages

NAMPA, Idaho , December 2, 2022

NAMPA, IDAHO โ€“ Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) today urged officials in Mozambique to expedite the release of pilot Ryan Koher, a U.S. citizen who has been wrongfully detained in the country since November 4. MAF also called on U.S. government leaders to do everything in their power to bring Koher home, and invited Christians around the world to pray for Koherโ€™s safety and swift release. 

โ€œRyan Koher did nothing wrong,โ€ said MAF President and CEO David Holsten. โ€œHis wife and children deserve to have him back home in time for Christmas, and the organization that serves the orphans in northern Mozambique needs the supplies he was trying to deliver when he was wrongly detained. I urge Christians around the world to pray for Ryanโ€™s safety and swift release, and call on those in power both in Mozambique and here in the U.S. to do everything they can to resolve this wrongful detainment.โ€

Koher, 31, is a pilot for Ambassador Aviation Ltd. (AAL), which is a partner of U.S.-based non-profit MAF. He was detained in Mozambique November 4 along with two South African nationals โ€“ W.J. du Plessis, 77, and Eric Dry, 69 โ€“ on the apparent suspicion of supporting insurgents in the country. The two South Africans had brought in the supplies for the orphanages. 

Koher was detained prior to piloting a charter flight to deliver supplies to orphanages near Montepuez, Mozambique. While conducting the normal security scan at the airport November 4, police took an interest in some vitamins, over-the-counter medications, and food preservative supplies Koher was to deliver for the orphanages and adult staff. None of the confiscated material belonged to Koher nor had it been loaded onto the airplane. AAL has been conducting these annual supply charter flights to the orphanages since 2014. 

The three men have been jailed on a still undetermined written charge, but there appears to be suspicion that, due to its destination in northern Mozambique, the flight was supporting insurgent activity. In actuality, Ambassador Aviation has long sought to care for those who have been harmed by the insurgency, including evacuating innocent residents following a March 2021 insurgent attack. 

AAL has retained a lawyer for Koher and the U.S. Embassy is engaged in the situation. Embassy officials attempted to meet with Koher on November 16 but were denied access to him at a prison in Inhambane. AAL later learned Koher had been moved to the Machava High Security Prison near Maputo. 

โ€œRyan is a caring and gentle individual,โ€ Holsten added. โ€œOver the last couple of years, he and his wife have worked hard to learn the language and culture of Mozambique to better serve those who rely on our service. Understandably, this situation has been very challenging for the family. We fully believe in Ryanโ€™s innocence, and we are all praying that this issue will be resolved very soon with the charges dismissed and Ryan released.โ€

Following Koherโ€™s move to an undetermined location, MAFโ€™s security protocols required that his wife and young children return to the United States to allow for better care by the organization and family. Information about the Koher family can be found at https://maf.org/missionaries/koher 

Mission Aviation Fellowship began serving the people of Mozambique in 1999, and in 2014, Ambassador Aviation became the operational entity as a registered charter service in the country. Based out of Nampula with two aircraft, the Cessna 206 Koher was to pilot at the time of his detainment and a Cessna Grand Caravan, typical flights include medical care and evacuations through the MOZMED project, VAMOZ, a Mozambican humanitarian volunteer organization, the Wildlife Conservation Society, and JOCUM (YWAM).

In 2021, AAL evacuated over 800 people from Afungi following insurgent attacks on Palma in the Cabo Delgado province. They also provided 24,476 kg (approximately 54,000 lbs.) of food, medicine, and relief supplies to the area. AAL delivered 29 aid workers, primarily from VAMOZ, and 32 medical workers, the majority from the Mozambican Ministry of Health. In addition, medical evacuation flights were conducted in the area for several months in late 2021 and early 2022 as the region recovered from the attacks.

In 2019, AAL provided a disaster assessment by air following Cyclones Idai and Kenneth and conducted 184 relief flight legs, delivering over 45,000 kg (about 99,207.9 lbs.) of cargo and 691 passengers as part of the humanitarian assistance response.

# # #

Mission Aviation Fellowship (www.maf.org) was founded in 1945 by WWII pilots who had a vision for using aviation to spread the gospel. Since that time, MAF has grown into a global family of organizations serving in 37 countries across Africa, Asia, Eurasia, Indonesia, and Latin America, supporting the work of missionaries, Bible translators, and relief and humanitarian agencies around the world. MAFโ€™s U.S. headquarters is in Nampa, Idaho.

A Saturday that We Didn’t Expect – But Saving a Life – It’s “Totally Worth It”

It was Saturday morning the 19th of March. It had been a long week with many very early mornings and late nights. Connie and I were moving a bit slowly on this particular morning. I had just stepped out of the shower and was headed to the kitchen to make some coffee for the two of us (I try to give Connie a break and handle the weekend coffee.) It’s a ritual we have each morning, sitting together in our chairs in the living room, reading our bibles and spending quiet time with the Lord, gathering the strength for another day.

The ringing of my phone interrupted my thoughts. I glanced at the Caller ID, Dr. Ben Radcliffe from Kudjip Nazarene Hospital. With Dr. Ben calling at this hour on a Saturday morning, I had a fairly strong feeling that this day was going to be quite different from what I was expecting. But then, that is our motto for PNG. The Land of the Unexpected! And that is why we are here…to serve!!!

And so it was. Dr. Ben quickly relayed to me the situation, that of a national team member suffering a life-threatening emergency during the night, necessitating a medical evacuation to the capital city as quickly as possible. There are no roads between Mt. Hagen and the Capital City. It is a one hour jet ride or two hour flight by MAF aircraft across the tropical rainforest of this rugged island nation.

And so…plans were put in motion! I would like to now transition to a post by our PNG National Pilot, Joseph Tua (Initials JET), and let him describe the day…

TuaFlyingForLife: Woke up at 7am and had a cup of coffee and the weather was absolutely beautiful outside and we thought “What a nice day to fly!”๐Ÿ˜

And then the phone rings and it’s our Country Director… “Joseph, are you checked out on the Hagen – Moresby Route?”

“Yes sir, I am”

“How soon can you get the plane ready? We have a medevac patient who suffered a heart attack at Kudjip hospital and needs to go to Moresby right away”

“I’ll have the plane ready to go by 8.30am sir”

“Good. They’ll be here at 9am”

And boom! We scrabble into the shower, grab our overnight gear just incase… Headset… Water… EFB… Phone… Etc etc and off we went to the airport! ๐Ÿƒโ€โ™‚๏ธ

We were ready to go by 8.30am…Patient and Doctor arrived at around 9am. Loaded them all up, strapped the patient down as comfortable as we could. And off to Moresby we went. It’s a 2-hour flight and the weather was great the whole way๐Ÿ˜

PIH ambulance was already there waiting. We transferred the patient from the plane onto the stretcher/bed that PIH had brought and basically handed over everything to them. We returned to Hagen with no issues. Weather was absolutely beautiful! Thank you to whoever was praying for this flight! โค๏ธ

Totally Worth It!!

JET

We got a message just around 6.30pm that the patient received whatever care and attention he needed and was stabilized at the PIH ICU in Moresby. Totally worth it! ๐Ÿคฉ

Thank you for the continued prayer and support fam! Have a great weekend! ๐Ÿคฉ๐Ÿค™


This was an awesome day. I had the opportunity to fly with Joseph on this flight and work side-by-side with this incredibly capable and competent young pilot. It’s hard for me to explain how proud I am of this young man who willingly forgoes the lure of greater money and fame to pursue the the call of the Lord to serve his people here in Papua New Guinea, flying with MAF.

JET (as we affectionately call him) is also a great writer and frequently posts of his experiences “Flying for Life” here in PNG. If you would like to live life through the eyes of one of our pilots, I would encourage you to follow him on Instagram.

https://www.instagram.com/tuaflyingforlife/

Serving Together to Bring Help, Hope, and Healing to Those Many Have Forgotten..

This week has been quite the week! It seems that every day there has not been one, but two or three medical evacuations!

On Friday, 17-September, Our MAF Operations Center in Mount Hagen, received the call of a young man who was gravely ill and who needed to be transported from the remote village of Suki in the Western Province of Papua New Guinea, to the Regional Hospital in Daru.

Plans were immediately initiated. PNG National Pilot, Joseph Tua, was contacted and of course, he was only too willing to come to the airport and prepare the aircraft for a launch to Suki.

Departing Mt. Hagen at 15 minutes past 2pm, under fairly beautiful skies, Joseph flew the one hour, thirty-five minute flight to Suki.

Upon arrival he found a young man who several days prior, had been speared in the abdominal region during a fight. Time was of the essence! Infection had spread, the bowel had become blocked for the past few days, and this young man was in truly critical condition.

Joseph and the village helpers carefully loaded the patient into P2-MEW, one of our new C-208 Caravans, and Joseph was off to Daru, a life critically hanging in the balance.

Joseph loading the young man with the help of the villagers

At 15 minutes past 5 pm, Joseph and his patient landed in Daru. An ambulance was waiting and the patient was whisked away for life-saving surgery.

Had our MAF plane not been there on this day, this young man would have very likely perished. This is why we do what we do! Sharing God’s love each day through tangible expressions; providing help, hope, and healing in Christ’s name!

Thank you to each of our Ministry Partners! We are here on the front lines because you are there, sacrificially praying and paying the price!

Three Days to Go…

Warmest greetings to you from Tarangau 2 (our house) in Mt. Hagen!  I was telling Connie, “Wow…this quarantine time has just ‘flown by’ hasn’t it!!  Seems like just yesterday we arrived and started the fourteen days, now only three days left to go!”  From the look on her face, I immediately understood that our perceptions of quarantine have been a bit different ๐Ÿ™‚ .    We do both agree that we are very ready to get out and about with our team and to have guests in for coffee and fellowship.  We’re definitely counting the days!

Thanks to modern technology, I have been able to be pretty much fully connected from the confines of quarantine. Within an hour of arrival I had my desk and computer screens set up and was able to be engaged with the activity on the ground.

Todd participating in a video conference with several staff members.

Due to the pending arrival of new families with various housing needs, Connie and I shifted to a different home. The missionaries who were living in the home before, left quite abruptly due to the concerns related to Covid and our lack of supportive healthcare here in the highlands. This meant that they had no time to pack up their belongings in preparation for their departure. So Connie has been very busy connecting with the couple (who live in New Zealand) getting instructions on what gets packed and how, and then working through the process of making it happen.

Connie Packing Boxes

I (Todd) have been very busy with end-of-the-year tasks. Writing funding proposals, preparing for leadership team meetings, annual review to come, and catching up on things we’ve missed while being out of the country. On the weekends I’ve been helping Connie with the heavier lifting and house maintenance that needed to be done. We’re slowly getting things whipped into shape!

We should be out of quarantine on the 16th and will hit the ground running with a flight to the north coast town of Lae on the 17th for a survey trip to look at options for re-opening work into the Morobe Province.

Thank you for your continued prayers and encouragement! So greatly appreciated!

Many Blessings,

Todd & Connie Lou

Mid-Day in Mount Hagen – We have Arrived!

The Lordโ€™s blessings never cease to amaze us! Literally traveling almost around the world under Covid-19 conditions has proven to be an experience we wonโ€™t soon forget. And neither will we forget how the Lord was with us each step. From transfers, baggage checks, paperwork clearances, Covid test results (in 6 hours versus the advised 24-48 hours) and right up to arrival in PNG. The gate agent in Kuala Lumpur asked us if we would like to move forward in the plane a bit. Sure – why not – this would allow us to process quicker on arrival in PNG…it did…and we were so grateful!!

The weather in the highlands usually deteriorates rapidly each afternoon around 3pm. Due to quarantine restrictions, Connie and I along with another family from World Gospel Mission, were to be traveling from Port Moresby to Mt. Hagen on a MAF airplane, a 2-hour trip. We needed to be airborne by 1pm. Arriving to Port Moresby after 11:00am on the flight from Kuala Lumpur, we would definitely be racing against the clock to clear the health controls, immigration, collect bags, go through customs, and get to the MAF Hangar, the aircraft loaded, and be on our way!

Again, the Lord cleared the way. The first bags off the conveyor belt were ours! As we approached the health desk to work through all of the paperwork to confirm our approvals and quarantine requirements, the lady looked at our passports and MAF shirt and said, โ€œOh, Iโ€™ve been expecting you. I received an email just a little while ago – youโ€™re all cleared!!โ€ (Thank you Sonali – our HR Manager – she was really putting in the overtime). The other family was shortly behind us.

We arrived at the MAF Hangar in Port Moresby and MAF Senior Pilot Mathias Glass had just landed in our C208 Caravan. We were also met by our Port Moresby office team, Leah and Sandra, and by our MAF Administrative Officer, Eric Eribiang, who also happened to be in POM. Together we all were able to get the plane packed and ready to go. As we taxied out I looked down at my watch, 12:45pm, we were well on our way and on time. Thanks team for your TREMENDOUS efforts.

Loading P2-MAL at Port Moresby – racing against the clock and weather!

And so, as I write this we are at 10,000 feet, flying northwest, paralleling the southern coast of Papua New Guinea. We will very shortly turn to the North and head across the lush rain forest and high mountains to our Mt. Hagen base. Looking down, I am beginning to see the winding rivers, muddy but bright, reflecting the broken clouds in the sky, as they make their way through the rainforest, remote villages nestled along their shores. There are no roads down there, only rainforest, foot trails, villages of people, and the rivers. Dengue Fever, Malaria, Typhoid, Tuberculosis, and deadly snakes make their home down there as well.

And that is why we are once again here in Papua New Guinea. To be the wings of hope, the โ€œlife lineโ€ to the millions of people who make their home in the jungles. Bringing not just medical relief, but the message of Godโ€™s love to some of the most remote peoples of the world. Thank you for being part of the team that makes up this vital link!

A final note: Upon landing, we were greeted by our incredible team. We are so very humbled to be loved in this way and in many other ways (groceries in our home, furniture set up, a hot meal delivered in the evening, so many welcoming messages, and much more). It makes us want to serve and love our team even more! May the Lord continue to grant us the grace, wisdom, and perseverance to continue in the task that He has called us to.

It’s Midnight in Malaysia

And the journey continues. We are now at gate 33 along with probably 50+ other people from several different missions, all waiting to board the World Food Programme, special Malaysia Air Charter Flight 8796. This flight has been arranged so that there is a reliable way of reaching Papua New Guinea.

We arrived shortly after 8am local time here in Kuala Lumpur, some 35 hours after departing Boise. We have been so blessed as the flights have been smooth and we have had minimal issues at the transfers. So very thankful to Jan Bell (Journey’s by Jan), Sonali Ghosh (MAF PNG HR Manager) and Rachel Green (MAF Ashford Admin) who have been working tickets and paperwork all along the way. We are also so thankful for the many others who have been praying and paying the price for this return trip to PNG.

In about five minutes, we will be boarding for the final day (Lord Willing) of the trip. This will take us from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to Kuching, Malaysia, to Port Moresby where we will be arriving sometime around 11 in the morning, Port Moresby time. We will then board a MAF plane (if the weather holds) for the flight from Port Moresby to our main base in the Highlands, Mount Hagen.

There are still some unknowns: 1) The weather has been very marginal in the highlands lately. If it is bad, we will need to quarantine for one night in Port Moresby before continuing to Mt. Hagen. 2) A new order has been issued by the Government of PNG, requiring GPS tracking devices to be worn by all persons arriving internationally for the duration of the required 14 day quarantine. This is something totally new and it is unknown if it will allow us to quarantine at our base in the Highlands as was the original plan. The alternative is to quarantine at a hotel in Port Moresby for the 14 days at a significant cost. Please continue to pray.

The weather today over Port Moresby – as posted by one of our pilots. He has wisely chosen to keep the plane on the ground!

And for those who love aviation – here are some pictures taken from the flight cameras on the plane as we arrived to Kuala Lumpur.